Pierre Cachia, Couple Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist and Head of Tavistock Relationships’ Online Therapy Service, has been responsible for establishing and developing ground-breaking work in this area.  

This online self-directed learning course is a follow-up to Cachia’s successful three-part series, 'Online Therapy: How to Make the Transition to Working Online and How to Develop Good Practice'. 

Cachia draws on his extensive clinical and supervisory experience to offer an analysis of the benefits and pitfalls of ongoing psychotherapeutic work online. He conceptualises this work though discussion of four domains, which are understood to reflect a certain quality of experience: the therapist’s domain, the patient’s domain, the technological domain and the psychological domain.

He suggests that the online therapist would do well to remain curious about these domains, and hold in mind an appreciation of the potential effects of the camera’s gaze for therapist and patient alike.

Consideration is given to the ways in which the spatial domains of therapist and patient intersect, to the technological aspects that can problematise or enhance the therapeutic encounter and to ways in which the psychology of cyberspace may impact on therapeutic work.

Please note:
Some material from our previous course Online Therapy: How to Make the Transition to Working Online and How to Develop Good practice is repeated in this new training for consolidation purposes.

This course includes:

  • Video lecture of 1 hr 20 mins
  • Presentation slide set
  • Self-directed learning question set
  • Practitioner checklist for online therapy
  • Reading list.

(CPD certificates are available on request for people who have completed the course).

See the following introduction video:

 

 



(Purchase of this course allows 3 months' access).

In this course Stan Ruszczynski explores the psychoanalytic approach to thinking about couple interaction, and understanding what enables and what inhibits or prevents couple well-functioning. The video lecture demonstrates the importance of this approach: that 'we are the products of our relationships, and our ways of relating shape our world'. Central to the psychoanalytic model of the mind is that human nature develops and is fundamentally based on intrapsychic, interactive, and interpersonal processes — processes necessary to meet the needs and requirements of the developing individual.

This course includes a video, question set and reading list.

View the introduction video for this course below:


(Purchase of this course allows 3 months' access).

In this course Mary Morgan discusses how she tackles the fundamental challenge of finding meaning, particularly the unconscious meaning of symptoms, behaviour and experience, central to the psychoanalytic way of thinking and working. If we can discover meaning then this is part of the process of containment. 

In this lecture, anonymised case material is used to illuminate the process involved.

This course includes a video, question set and reading list.

View the introductory video below:



(Purchase of this course allows 3 months' access).

Warren Colman describes an aversion and hostility to relating due to the difficulty of relating to an other who is different from ourselves and who does not conform to our wishes. This can become a stuck pattern in couples striving for omnipotent perfection in themselves and others to avoid the pain of loss and disappointment, especially, he says, when loss is experienced as equivalent to abandonment.

This course includes a video, question set and reading list.

See the introductory video below:


(Purchase of this course allows 3 months' access).

Therapy has historically been viewed as a ‘talking cure’. This is called into question by Dr Christopher Clulow who considers the process of psychoanalytic couple therapy from an attachment perspective, highlighting the potential for working with the nonverbal communication of affective states. Attachment theory highlights the significance of behaviour for communicating about emotional experience.

This course includes a video, question set and reading list.

See the introductory video:



(Purchase of this course allows 3 months' access).

The intimate couple relationship contains relationship templates formed in infancy and beyond, and significant residues of early trauma and conflicts, shared by the couple in the way Hewison describes, that have the potential to lead to or prevent further development and growth. A major challenge to this development occurs when there is a profound difficulty in “sharing psychic space “without feeling taken over or psychically annihilated. When there are two viewpoints, a fear arises that one will invalidate or obliterate the other. Andrew Balfour describes how these couples function at a predominantly paranoid-schizoid developmental level and become trapped in with “either/or” struggles between “my way” versus “your way”.

This course includes a video, question set and reading list.

See the introductory video below:


(Purchase of this course allows 3 months' access).

In this self-directed learning set featuring six online lectures, you will be able to watch and listen to contributions by Tavistock Relationships authors who have played a major part in the development of couple psychoanalytic psychotherapy. Stanley Ruszczynski, Mary Morgan, Warren Colman, Dr David Hewison, Andrew Balfour and Dr Christopher Clulow will introduce you to some of the key thinking that underpins the Tavistock Relationships psychoanalytic approach to thinking about couple interaction. The aim is to highlight what enables and what inhibits or prevents couple well-functioning.

This view of couple interaction as a dynamic to which both partners contribute and that is shared, rather than the commonly held view by couples in distress that their relationship’s dysfunction is the responsibility or fault of one or the other who must change if the relationship to improve, is something special offered by couple psychoanalytic psychotherapy as developed at Tavistock Relationships in London over the past 70 years.

Reading lists and question sets for self-directed learning are included.

In this self-directed online learning course, Pierre Cachia, Tavistock Relationships' Head of Online Therapy reflects on his experience of online practice and discusses interpretation and therapeutic intervention in online therapy.

Topics include:

  • Management of Risk and Safeguarding Confidentiality
  • Issues Around Jurisdiction and International Delivery
  • Counter Indications for Online Therapy
  • Working in a Different Frame
  • Visual Composition as Communication
  • What Does the Image from the Webcam Convey
  • Implications of Operating in Cyberspace
  • Reaching New Populations

See trailer video below for the full series of courses Online Therapy: How to Make the Transition to Working Online, and How to Develop Good Practice.


In this self-directed learning course, Pierre Cachia, Tavistock Relationships' Head of Online Therapy discusses technology in the therapeutic frame and getting the setting right for clients.

Topics include:

  • Computer System Requirements for Online Therapy
  • How to Choose Your Videoconferencing Software
  • Ensuring a Reliable Connection
  • Selecting Hardware and Peripherals for Online Therapy
  • Preparing a Suitable Clinical Space for Delivery of Online Therapy
  • Being Well Prepared as a Clinician for Online Therapy
  • Becoming an Online Patient
  • Contingency Planning and Using Successful Protocols in Your Online Practice

See the trailer video below for the full Online Therapy series of courses.



(Purchase of this course allows three months' access.)

In this self-directed learning course, Pierre Cachia, Tavistock Relationships' Head of Online Therapy discusses the online medium, characteristics, opportunities and limitations.

Topics include:

  • Terminology
  • Digital Immigrants and  Digital Natives
  • Psychic Space and Cyberspace
  • The Online Disinhibition Effect
  • Positive and Negative Aspects of Cyberspace
  • The Culture of the Online Medium
  • The Good and Bad of eTherapy
View below the trailer for the full set of lectures in this series: